The First-ever Latinas in Higher Education Conference Just Took Place in New York City

The First-ever Latinas in Higher Education Conference Just Took Place in New York City belatina latine

For the first time ever, the Latinas in Higher Education Conference took place at the Bronx Community College in New York City on September 30.

During the inaugural conference, faculty and staff members from the City University of New York (CUNY) system and beyond, joined forces to talk about the current status of higher education. In these conversations, they highlighted the bare truth of Latina workers in higher education.

What’s the truth about Latinas in higher education?

“Statistically, in higher education, less than 2 percent of full-time faculty members are Latinas,” Leidy K. Pichardo, the associate director of BCC’s (Bronx Community College) college discovery program and chairperson of the Association of Latina Faculty and Staff (ALFS) said.

Pichardo continued, “BCC is a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). That’s important. Fifty-eight percent of our student population is of Latino descent. We wanted to expose the talent of our faculty and staff of BCC and other community colleges, the wonderful work that’s being done, on behalf of Latina faculty and staff.”

According to Diverse Education, the conference also mentioned the gender gap. They pointed out that the “majority of women [academic] presidents in the nation are women,” but that “they get paid about $100,000 less than men who teach at universities and senior colleges.” 

How is that not surprising?

That’s not all they discussed. The conference touched upon topics such as ideas on how to involve Latine women in STEM fields and even shared how “intrusive advising” helped BCC’s graduation rate from 7 percent to 20 percent in a decade.

Conferences like this transparent, innovative one are important for us. They not only help Latinas recognize where we stand but can also motivate the next generation to build up what we’re currently paving the ways towards.

With first-handed help from those who are already experienced, we can detail what we need in order to thrive – as well as understand what needs to be fixed in our society.

“The mission of this historic event is to celebrate and highlight the scholarship, service, and contributions of Latinas faculty and staff,” the statement reads. “The conference attendance and call for proposals are open to our CUNY colleagues and Bronx community-based organizations.”

For more information about the Latinas in Higher Education Conference, visit their official website.

Kudos to those who brought this together!