Remote Work Helped Latinos and Black Employees Land More Jobs at Twitter

Latinos Twitter BELatina Latinx
Photo courtesy of BELatina.

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic was a litmus test for labor models — especially those that relied on the capitalist model to perpetuate inequalities.

While people of color remained on the front lines, large corporations despaired at not being able to keep their employees in offices. 

It was then that the Darwinian concept of “survival of the fittest” came into play, demonstrating once again all that was wrong with the labor system.

Twitter Inc.’s early switch to a “work-from-anywhere” model early in the pandemic was a case in point.

After implementing a requirement to add more people of color to the final lists of job candidates, Twitter Inc. sharply increased its hiring of Black and Latino employees over the past year, Bloomberg reported.

The proportion of Black workers in the U.S. workforce jumped to 9.4% in 2021 from 6.9% a year earlier, and Latino workers to 8% of employees from 5.5%, the company said Wednesday. Twitter did not disclose how many workers the improvement represents or the current size of the U.S. workforce. In the third quarter, the company had 7,100 workers globally.

“In an all-virtual environment, there are very few limitations to where we can show up to meet talent as a company,” said James Loduca, Twitter vice president of inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility. “We were able to hire folks in markets that we know have high populations of Black talent, markets that we know have high populations of Latinx talent.”

By 2020, Twitter promised that women would make up half of the workforce and that underrepresented groups would make up 25% of the U.S. workforce by 2025, Bloomberg continued. Women were 44.7% of the global workforce in 2021. Loduca said that the total proportion of underrepresented workers would be updated along with first-quarter financial results. Executive pay is now determined in part by meeting those diversity targets.

Currently, Twitter has said that many workers never have to return to the office and can “work from anywhere,” even after the pandemic ends.