Verano Nostalgia: This Is What ‘Un Verano Sin Ti’ Really Means, According to a Boricua

Verano Nostalgia: This Is What ‘Un Verano Sin Ti’ Really Means, According to a Boricua belatina latine

Summer might be over, but Bad Bunny’s Un Verano Sin Ti is still — and probably always will be — part of our daily music playlists. We know the lyrics of each song, we dance to “Tití Me Preguntó,” and we definitely enjoy a chill evening drive, iced coffee on hand, and “Neverita” in the background. 

However, Benito’s fourth solo studio album goes beyond just cool, catchy, and perreito material. There’s a meaning behind his song lyrics that may be disguised with Puerto Rican slang and references.

Want to know what these canciones really mean? 

The Puerto Rican slang used in ‘Un Verano Sin Ti’

Boricua podcaster Gio Rosado took the time to go through all of the Un Verano Sin Ti tracks and spotted all the jerga — or slang —, so all the Latine community could understand what’s behind the Conejo Malo songs.

¡Ponme atención! If you’re a Bad Bunny fan, don’t keep scrolling down (on TikTok) because what I have for you is something exclusive that you won’t find anywhere else in TikTok,” says the content creator in a clip. “If you’re a Bad Bunny fan and live outside of Puerto Rico, I have something that will help you understand his music a lot better.”

@gioarosado

Gracias por su apoyo !

♬ original sound – Gio Rosado

Rosado is referring to a digital publication he created for fans to acquire some boricua knowledge that the famous singer applies to his songs. The book can be bought online with its price starting at $5. 

In a preview shared in the podcaster’s TikTok video, you can see the language used in the song “Tití Me Preguntó.”

For example, the word “Tití” is an affectionate way to call your aunts, or tías, in Puerto Rico. Also, “Azaroso” means that he has many problems and setbacks. The book also features words and phrases like “perrear,” “pelón,” “caripelao,” and “pero si vuelve’ a la Antártica.”

“You’ll be of great support if you buy the digital book with all the songs,” says Rosado. “Se los agradezco.

I’m — for sure — now waiting for Tití to ask me about these new words I’m adding to my vocabulary.