What Donald Trump and Michael Bloomberg Have in Common: A Sexist Repertoire

Photo Credit Nick Valinote/FilmMagic

In the Democratic Party’s desperate campaign to find someone who can beat President Donald J. Trump in his bid for re-election, there are many details that are escaping the eye.

While it is clear that asking for a “perfect” candidate is almost impossible, overlooking the mistreatment of an Amy Klobuchar to her staff or the radicalism of the ranks of a Bernie Sanders is totally different from overlooking the sexist record of a Michael Bloomberg.

Last Friday, Michael Kranish stirred up history and reminded us in his column for the Washington Post how, by 1990, there was a printed account of the “macho side of one of the nerdiest men on Wall Street.”

At that time, one of his company’s assistants gave him for his 48th birthday a 32-page booklet of “profane, sexist quotes she attributed to him”, which, despite being taken as a joke by most of the male staff, was an example of a hostile workplace.

“If women wanted to be appreciated for their brains, they’d go to the library instead of to Bloomingdale’s,” says one of the former New York mayor’s pearls.

The businessman and now candidate for the presidency of the Democratic Party apparently went far beyond misogynistic comments during his years at the head of his data empire, and chained a string of lawsuits for sexism and discrimination in his offices.

“Several lawsuits have been filed over the years alleging that women were discriminated against at Bloomberg’s business-information company,” Kranish wrote, “including a case brought by a federal agency and one filed by a former employee, who blamed Bloomberg for creating a culture of sexual harassment and degradation.”

While the decades of complaints and thousands of documents reviewed by the Post do not include inappropriate sexual conduct, they do speak to the candidate’s lifetime perception of women.

According to the Post‘s report, one of the most transparent examples of Bloomberg’s behavior was described by Sekiko Sakai Garrison, a top saleswoman who recounted how the candidate told women in the sales department to line up and offer oral sex to a colleague who had announced his marriage in 1989.

In fact, Bloomberg words bring him very close to the man he intends to defeat in the November election.

In a 1996 interview with The Guardian, Bloomberg said of his post-divorce bachelor life: “I like theater, dining and chasing women. Let me put it this way: I am a single, straight billionaire in Manhattan. What do you think? It’s a wet dream.”

Nothing that far from the “locker room” comments made by another New York billionaire who now sits in the White House without ever having taken responsibility for his actions.

Bloomberg has passed over candidates with solid campaigns such as former San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro or Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris just because of the privilege of his bank accounts, and despite not having qualified for the Nevada primary, his campaign is still going strong.

As former Vice President Joe Biden said: “$60 billion can buy you a lot of advertising, but it can’t erase your record.”