Our Favorite Latinx Leaders on Time 100’s List of Most Influential People in 2019

Ozuna IG @ozuna
Photo Credit IG @ozuna

Time’s 100 Most Influential People spans politicians to icons to artists to pioneers in their field of work. The list precedes next week’s Time 100 Summit, which takes place in New York City and will feature leaders and Time 100 honorees as part of their progressive series of discussions, interviews, and panels.

Here are some of our favorite Latinx influencers who made the Time 100 list in 2019:

Ozuna

Ozuna IG @ozuna Time 100 Summit
Photo Credit IG @ozuna

Daddy Yankee, who just released a remix of “Con Calma” featuring Katy Perry, wrote of the first time that he met fellow Boricua artist Ozuna. “[What got my attention was his tenacity, his sublime and unique voice, and his drive. He was fearless to ask a superstar to be part of his record.” Daddy Yankee honored Ozuna as an example to anyone who puts in hard work to realize their dreams, and also as someone who then gives back to the community. According to Billboard, Ozuna was the most-viewed artist of 2018 on YouTube, in any genre; he told the publication, “If I have the opportunity of having so many followers, and helping to take Latino artists and culture to the mainstream, I’m not going to selfishly throw it away because I learned English and can ‘cross over.’ ”

Yalitza Aparicio

Yalitza Aparicio BeLatina Time 100 Summit

Unassuming big screen ingénue Yalitza Aparicio made the list with an entry from award-winning director Alfonso Cuarón, who cast her as the lead for his film Roma. “I knew Yalitza was the one as soon as she walked in the door,” he wrote. “When I offered her the role of Cleo, she candidly told me she had just finished school and was waiting to become a teacher. Then she said, ‘I have nothing better to do, so yes.’” He cited her fearless acting chops as “an amazing gift” and expressed the hope that she would continue to take up space in a field where she can practice her craft and also “[embrace the symbolic value of what she has done] for indigenous people. Aparicio dedicated the Time honor “para todos ustedes” and to take pride in and never forget where we’ve all come from.

Alexandria-Ocasio Cortez

Thank You #AOC Time 100 summit
Magazine Cover Montage #AOC

Time cover girl AOC got mad props from Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, a politician with vast experience as an advocate for the people. “A year ago, she was taking orders across a bar. Today, millions are taking cues from her,” wrote Warren. “She reminds all of us that even while greed and corruption slow our progress, even while armies of lobbyists swarm Washington, in our democracy, true power still rests with the people.” Warren no doubt sees herself in Ocasio-Cortez; both ladies have humble, hard-working origin stories that have shaped the way that they represent their constituents.

Luchita Hurtado

Luchita Hurtado Belatina Time 100 summit
Photo Credit Time 100 Luchita Hurtado in her Santa Monica home and studio.

Venezuelan-born American artist Luchita Hurtado made her way to the list through an homage by world-renowned gallerist Hans Ulrich Obrist, whose Serpentine Gallery in London will be putting on the first ever museum retrospective of her work. She’s 98 years old, mind you. “Luchita is finally getting the attention she has long deserved,” wrote Obrist, listing all of the genres of creation that she’s worked in over her nearly a century on Earth: painting, photography, fashion, poetry, and environmental activism. “Her vision of the human body as a part of the world, not separate from nature, is more urgent today than ever.”

Brie Larson

Brie Larson Belatina Time 100
Photo Credit IG @brielarson

Okay, obviously Brie Larson isn’t Latina, but we love Tessa Thompson and what she had to say about her fellow actress. Thompson wrote her praise of Captain Marvel lead Larson, whose film shattered the ceiling for female-led superhero movies. As of today, the movie raked in over $1 billion in ticket sales. Thompson cited Larson’s work for gender equality, representation, and inclusivity. “Her activism is an extension of who she is. She sits at a table and wants to make sure everyone has access to it. She is constantly investigating how to be a better ally,” wrote Thompson. “She is in a position to make real systemic change in Hollywood.”