Whatever Happened to Silvia Pinal of ‘Mujer, Casos De La Vida Real’?

Silvia Pinal BELatina Latinx
Photo courtesy of Televisa

With over seventy years of experience on screen, Silvia Pinal, the Mexican actress, singer, stage and television producer, and politician is the original momager

Born in Sonora, Mexico, in September 1931, Pinal began her career with a role in the play Los Caprichos de Goya, directed by the Mexican actor and director of Cuban origin, Rafael Banquells, who would later become her first husband. 

Throughout her career, Pinal worked alongside entertainment figures such as Mario Fortino Alfonso Moreno Reyes (Cantinflas) — who was also her wedding godfather — Pedro Infante, Jorge Mistral, and Luis Buñuel. It was in the Spanish director’s film, Viridiana (1961), that Pinal’s talent as an actress awarded her Palme d’Or at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival.

1985’s “Mujer, Casos de la Vida Real” is probably the most salient television production Pinal has worked on. Created and presented by Silvia, the show was initially conceived as a response to the Mexican earthquake of 1985, intended to be a reenactment of authentic circumstances sent in by the audience. 

During the nineties, the show stepped away from the light themes, of lost love, and romances and began focusing on rougher topics such as abuse, queer representation, rape, domestic violence, among other things. The last episode of “Mujer, Casos de la Vida Real” was aired in 2006. 

In her personal affairs, Pinal’s life is rich in experiences, both extremely sweet and also some rather traumatic events, such as the sudden death of her daughter Viridiana. And it’s not uncommon for entertainment dynasty families such as the Pinal to be filled with scandal and rumors. Such as the love triangle that involved Silvia Pinal, Fernando Frade, and Pinal’s  firstborn Sylvia Pasquel

Adding to the drama and unreal spirit of the events, the Pinal family was further hit with heartbreak as Sylvia Pasquel and Fernando Frade’s daughter, Viridiana, died drowned.  

The family’s matriarch has been a pillar in keeping the family together, as exemplified by the 2021 sexual abuse accusations that Frida Sofia made against Pinal’s third husband, Enrique Guzmán, a Mexican singer and idol of Rock and roll. 

Although Frida Sofia’s allegations of sexual abuse against her grandfather were denied and criticized by her own mother, Alejandra Guzmán, Silvia Pinal’s statement was received by a great number of followers as a serious and empathic way of dealing with the family conflict and providing support and care for the victim. 

After surviving COVID-19 at ninety years old, numerous family gossip, successes, and misfortunes, Pinal has created an empire of powerful women who lead the entertainment business in Mexico. Singers, actresses, models, and activists, all share Silvia’s matriarchal line and hereditary talent and beauty. 

In a male-dominant society like ours, dynasties, and entertainment empires ruled by women, such as the infamous Kardashian or the Pinal family, provide not only the views and scandal necessary to keep the public interested but an exciting, feminist approach to business. Not to be that person, drama and scandal are not gendered