Meet Rep. Sylvia Garcia, the Latina Legislator Who Will Serve as Manager in Donald Trump’s Impeachment

Nancy Garcia BELatina

Last Wednesday, the House of Representatives finally delivered the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, marking a milestone in history and doing so with the protocol it deserves.

“Today we will make history,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “As we make that history, we are making progress for the American people.”

In this way, Pelosi also announced the seven legislators that will have to present the case for impeachment before the Senate, giving them, as Politico explained, “a high-profile role and a chance to be at least a footnote in history.”

In a delicate selection, Pelosi not only organized a deeply diverse team that is representative of American society but also chose those with a strong background in advocacy and national security.

Among them, Texas Democratic Representative, and the first Latina in this important role, is Sylvia Garcia.

“God has been very good to me; he’s given me the opportunity to serve our public,” she said in an exclusive interview with Telemundo. “I want to assure you that I will do everything possible to be there, representing everyone together, we have more strength.”

Sylvia Rodriguez Garcia is part of the new wave of women and Latina representatives who took the House of Representatives by surprise after the midterm elections in November 2018.

Born in San Diego, Texas, Garcia received her education in social work from Texas Woman’s University, and her Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law.

Her work in a public service began in Houston in the 1980s, serving as a presiding judge of the Houston Municipal System, for five terms. By 1998, Garcia was working as a Houston city controller.

A member of the Harris County Commissioner’s Court in 2002, and later as a State Senator in 2013, Garcia is the living example of the trajectory of Latina women in the United States breaking the glass ceiling and opening doors for the next generation.

Although Texas has had its share of Hispanic representatives and public officials, the race for gender equality was still far behind during the last decades of the 20th century.

It wasn’t until the 2018 elections that women like Garcia had the opportunity to gain the support of their constituents and win, as was her case, with more than 60% of the votes in their districts and make it to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Garcia and Veronica Escobar became the first Latina congresswomen from Texas.

Now, in the face of the delicate political situation facing the country, Garcia will join her colleagues in trying to make the case that no one is above the law much less Donald Trump before a Republican-majority Senate.

“The reason is our Constitution, our democracy, our country, not the president’s motive, which is personal and political. It is he who has a political and personal motive,” she said in her interview.

“We will do everything possible to present our case and show the whole country that no one is above the law, not this president, nor anyone,” she concluded.