Bradley García Could Be the First Latino To Serve on Influential Federal Appeals Court

Bradley García BELatina Latinx
Image courtesy of BELatina.

Latinos continue to score “firsts” in history. Just ask Bradley García, the U.S. Department of Justice official nominated to serve on the influential federal appeals court in Washington, D.C.

As reported by NBC News, García, a veteran appellate lawyer and former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan, who now works in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, was nominated to sit on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Bradley García’s nomination was part of a presidential announcement last Wednesday when President Biden unveiled seven new judicial nominees.

Biden also made his first appointment to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals by selecting Magistrate Judge Dana Douglas, a former partner at Liskow & Lewis, to be the first woman of color on the conservative New Orleans-based court.

The White House said the nominees continue to fulfill Biden’s promise to diversify the federal judiciary, a large majority of whom have been women, people of color, or lawyers with experience in civil rights and public defense work.

Bradley Garcia graduated with honors from Johns Hopkins University (2008) and Harvard Law School (2011). He clerked for Justice Elena Kagan on the U.S. Supreme Court from 2012 to 2013 and for Justice Thomas Griffith on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit from 2011 to 2012.

From 2013 to 2022, Garcia was a partner in the Appellate and Supreme Court Practice Group at O’Melveny and Myers LLP.

Garcia has argued 13 cases before federal and state appellate courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the First, Third, Fourth, Ninth, Eleventh, and Federal Circuits.

He is now Biden’s fourth nominee for the D.C. Circuit, which many consider second only to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, García would succeed U.S. Circuit Judge Judith Rogers, an appointee of former Democratic President Bill Clinton, who announced last month that she planned to take senior status, a form of semi-retirement that creates vacancies for presidents to fill.