The Museu de Arte de São Paulo Joins the Wave of Institutions That Bet on Art Made by Women

Museu de Arte de São Paulo Beatriz BELatina

2019 was definitely the year when women artists — new and forgotten — took up their position in the art industry.

After the Feminist Art Coalition was born in the United States in search of opening more spaces for dialogue around feminism and female artistic production in the United States, institutions in Latin America have decided to do their part.

Simultaneously, the Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) acquired 296 works by women artists during the last twelve months, organizing exhibitions, publications, workshops, talks, and other events around the collection, according to Art Forum.

From Akosua Adoma Owusu and Catarina Simão to Laure Prouvost and Tarsila do Amaral, the institution has structured its exhibition program around the recovery of the works of women who have changed the history of art forever.

“At the end of its yearlong celebration of female cultural producers, MASP added 296 works by twenty-one contemporary artists, one collective, and many unknown women artists from the nineteenth century to its collection,” explains the media.

The curatorship included women from all over the world, including Egypt, Morocco, the Philippines, and Uzbekistan, trying to break down the differences between hegemonic art and the voices that, although always active, have been constantly relegated to the peripheries of the exhibition halls.

“This is a historic step for the institution toward a more balanced representation of art history in its collection, known for its major presence of white, male and European artists,” said Isabella Rjeille, who curated “Feminist Histories: Artists After 2000” and led many of the acquisitions, according to the magazine. Adriano Pedrosa, MASP’s artistic director, said the acquisitions will help the institution live up to its mission to become a much more “diverse, inclusive, and plural museum.”